The Daiso Diaries: Chapter 16

DaisoHeader

Location, location, location!

It’s all about the location.

Tokyo is THE location to be if you’re into Japanese fashion (or fashion in general to be honest), subculture and of course, if you’ve ever had a dream of making it in a big city.

This Saturday I’m off there yet again and I’ll be researching just what location means for Daiso in Tokyo.

In this week’s column, however, I’ve decided to take a look at the best and the worst location of Daiso in Hiroshima. Remember, this is just my opinion; you are more than welcome to disagree (Hiroshima people, obviously, I’m talking to you) and for all my other readers, tell me about your location experience, good or bad.

When I first moved to Hiroshima, I was unfortunately in a place that I now consider to be worse than my hometown. For those of you who know how much I detest my hometown and what it’s become thanks to mining, this statement means a lot!

In fact, this place makes my hometown look positively cheery and if given the option, I would surely return there, rather than face the dismal, dark, disturbing heap that is this place.

Where am I talking about?

Shitty Saijo.

Sorry, I mean Saijo. The ‘shitty,’ just came out naturally.

The only good thing about it is the sake/Nihonshuu (日本酒) and I’m fairly sure that is the only thing that makes it bearable for those who have to live there. By this, I mean they’re always drunk and don’t have to face the fact that it’s horrible. The place I mean, not the sake.

Have I mentioned I find this Godforsaken place the Hellhole of Earth?

No?

Well, let me just say it again: NOTHING good comes out of there. It is cursed.

That aside, if you live in a rural part of Hiroshima, most Daiso branches are located within shopping centres. This makes them pretty convenient because you don’t have to go out of your way to find them. You can literally do your grocery shopping and then pop into Daiso for the Essentials of Life (snacks, craft supplies and accessories… not necessarily in that order).

Although there are some Daiso in shopping centres within Hiroshima City (e.g. Aeon Mall in Fuchu- Tenjingawa Station is the closest), many also exist as stand-alone shops.

I kind of like this because it means you’re on a specific Daiso shopping expedition. Thus, you’re less likely to be distracted by other shops etc., which, to me always results in me forgetting what I went to Daiso for in the first place. Then again, if I simply go to Daiso, I often buy much, much more than I would if I was carrying bags from other shops too.

Now, let’s go for the bad news first: the worst location for Daiso in Hiroshima.

I for one feel that the worst Daiso in Hiroshima is the hole-in-the-wall (literally!) shop that is closest to Parco in Hondori. You have to fight to move past people and I have never been able to find what I want. This is probably because I’m trying to walk up the stairs which are as steep as a traditional Japanese house, and hoping to God that I don’t fall backwards and take all my fellow customers out on the way.

My biggest bone of where there SHOULD be a Daiso and there isn’t though, is Hiroshima Station.

WTF?!

It would be the perfect spot for so many reasons and would be a great last-minute gift idea place for tourists to go. Then again, this would also make most of the new shops in the station redundant, for why would you buy an expensive, boring gift when you could buy something cheap and awesome (and probably/hopefully useless) from Daiso? Mind you, I’m sure this is EXACTLY the reason they HAVEN’T put one here; they want you to have to spend your money.

I have now reached a point in my life (or possibly just in Hiroshima), where I don’t want to see anyone I know when I go downtown. Yes, that might seem antisocial and it probably is, but I have my reasons. Anyway, this means I have stopped going downtown unless I actually have to pass through it to actually get somewhere else. Also, my old favourite branch of Daiso in Hondori closed down (the end closest to the Peace Park bridge), so I learned to explore my own neighbourhood branches.

Thus, the best location of Daiso (for me) is the Yokogawa Station one. I like it for its accessories, its huge range of snacks and other easy-to-prepare-or-make foods and its craft and school supplies. It’s also conveniently located for when I’m getting off the train and realise I’ve forgotten every single thing on my list that I was supposed to get while I was on my shopping trip to Tenjingawa.

For intrepid travelling and exploration, I like the Dobashi branch and the one near my apartment (again, I’m not giving you the address because you might be a stalker). I often find myself jumping for joy about products I’ve discovered there. Usually I buy them and then they sit on my floor in their plastic Daiso bag until I finally decide one day to open them up and use them.

That’s my take anyway.

Next week I’ll report back on the Big Daddy (or Mummy; we’re equal opportunists here!) Daiso in Takeshita-dori in Harajuku.

Enjoy your long weekend! I know I will!

P.S. Obviously, I don’t have (and would never include if I did), photos of any Shithole… I mean, Saijo Daiso branches. I don’t apologise for that since I would never recommend going there. To Saijo I mean, not Daiso.

Actually I didn’t include ANY photos did I? It’s not that I didn’t want to include them; I didn’t have any! 😛

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s